medievalpoc
Biologists call a small male fish who darts in to fertilize eggs a “sneaker,”, a medium male who resembles a female a “female mimic,”, and a large aggressive territorial male a “parental,” to place a positive spin of his egg guarding. Both the sneaker and the female mimic are “sexual parasites” of the parental male’s “investment” in nest construction and territorial defense. The sneaker and the female mimic are said to express a gene for “cuckoldry,” as though the parental male were married to a female in his territory and victimized by her unfaithfulness. In fact, a territorial male and the female who is temporarily in his territory are not pair-bonded. Scientists sneak gender stereotypes into the primary literature and corrupt its objectivity. Are these descriptions only harmless words? No. The words affect the view of nature that emerges from biology.
Joan Roughgarden (2004) Evolution’s Rainbow: Diversity, Gender, and Sexuality in Nature and People, University of California Press, Berkley
(via 420-catnip)
erikkwakkel
erikkwakkel:

Hidden Book
This unusual shot I took some time ago when I visited the Abbey of Rolduc, in the south of the Netherlands. While my finger carefully lifts the loose cover of a sixteenth-century printed book, you are shown the inside of the binding, where the backs of the quires are held together by a horizontal strip of parchment. What’s so special about this scene is the fact that this strip was cut from a handwritten medieval manuscript - old-fashioned and therefore ideal for cutting up and recycling, binders thought. And so this early-fifteenth-century handwritten Dutch Bible found itself being sliced and diced. “I loved once,” the exposed text reads with a flair of irony and tragedy (Ic hebbe gheminnet). My finger allowed the strip to peek at the world again for the first time in centuries: that thought alone makes research of these fragments a thrilling activity.
Pic (my own): Rolduc Abbey, printed book in the attic library. More on fragments in this blog post.

erikkwakkel:

Hidden Book

This unusual shot I took some time ago when I visited the Abbey of Rolduc, in the south of the Netherlands. While my finger carefully lifts the loose cover of a sixteenth-century printed book, you are shown the inside of the binding, where the backs of the quires are held together by a horizontal strip of parchment. What’s so special about this scene is the fact that this strip was cut from a handwritten medieval manuscript - old-fashioned and therefore ideal for cutting up and recycling, binders thought. And so this early-fifteenth-century handwritten Dutch Bible found itself being sliced and diced. “I loved once,” the exposed text reads with a flair of irony and tragedy (Ic hebbe gheminnet). My finger allowed the strip to peek at the world again for the first time in centuries: that thought alone makes research of these fragments a thrilling activity.

Pic (my own): Rolduc Abbey, printed book in the attic library. More on fragments in this blog post.

itsnotlogicitsameanstoanend
itsnotlogicitsameanstoanend:

oupacademic:

livingbreathingelsa:

oupacademic Is this true?

To the best of our knowledge…
There is no clear date of foundation for the University of Oxford, but teaching existed at Oxford in some form in 1096 and developed rapidly from 1167, when Henry II banned English students from attending the University of Paris.
Tenochtitlan, the major Aztec city, was founded in ~1325, although the Mexica were part of an earlier migration to (present-day) central Mexico. Please note ‘Aztec’ is a rather wooly term that may refer to different aspects, eras, or people in Mexican history.
We encourage our followers to share resources on both the history of Oxford and the history of the Mexico for further research. Remember that these ‘facts’ are reminders that history happens everywhere, momentous events may occur in parallel, and no history is more valuable than another.

Check out the baller OUP response. That’s what’s up.

itsnotlogicitsameanstoanend:

oupacademic:

livingbreathingelsa:

oupacademic Is this true?

To the best of our knowledge…

There is no clear date of foundation for the University of Oxford, but teaching existed at Oxford in some form in 1096 and developed rapidly from 1167, when Henry II banned English students from attending the University of Paris.

Tenochtitlan, the major Aztec city, was founded in ~1325, although the Mexica were part of an earlier migration to (present-day) central Mexico. Please note ‘Aztec’ is a rather wooly term that may refer to different aspects, eras, or people in Mexican history.

We encourage our followers to share resources on both the history of Oxford and the history of the Mexico for further research. Remember that these ‘facts’ are reminders that history happens everywhere, momentous events may occur in parallel, and no history is more valuable than another.

Check out the baller OUP response. That’s what’s up.

#1 Blue Moon: Belgian White wheat beer, one of my favourite summer-y beers from previous trips to Florida. I can drink a whole lot of these before getting sick of them. I seem to remember reading somewhere that Rickard’s White is based off of this recipe? [edit: wikipedia]
#2: Red Hook Audible Ale: Pale Ale, although quite sour. Tasty, but wouldn’t want to drink a bunch of them. More a snacking kind of thing.
Both beers were paired with US Open tennis.

#1 Blue Moon: Belgian White wheat beer, one of my favourite summer-y beers from previous trips to Florida. I can drink a whole lot of these before getting sick of them. I seem to remember reading somewhere that Rickard’s White is based off of this recipe? [edit: wikipedia]

#2: Red Hook Audible Ale: Pale Ale, although quite sour. Tasty, but wouldn’t want to drink a bunch of them. More a snacking kind of thing.

Both beers were paired with US Open tennis.

emergentfutures
You might think that the things that get people to change their behavior are things that are memorable, that they can use their analytical brain to set down a long-term trace, or even just emotional, but surprisingly what we see is the brain regions that seem to be involved in successful persuasion. We can predict who will use more sunscreen next week based on how their brain responds to an ad today. The brain regions that seem to be critical to that are brain regions involved in social thinking, in thinking about yourself and thinking about other people. So this seems to be more about our identity and the identities that we’re capable of trying on. If I can’t try on the identity that you’re suggesting to me—being a sunscreen-using person, or a nonsmoker, or something like that—the ad is much less likely to stick.

[…]

William James said long ago that we have as many identities as people that we know, and probably more than that. We are different with different people. I’m different with my son than I am with you. We have these different identities that we try on, and they surround us… I’m really interested in looking at that as a mechanism of persuasion when it comes to regular old persuasion, when it comes to education, when it comes to public health, and when it comes to international issues as well. It’s finding that latitude of acceptance and finding out how to use it successfully.

UCLA neuroscientist Matthew Lieberman, author of Social: Why Our Brains Are Wired to Connect, studies "latitudes of acceptance" to understand what makes us change our minds – something we’re notoriously reluctant to do.

Also see Dan Pink on the psychology of persuasion.

Lieberman’s full Edge conversation is well worth a read.

(via explore-blog)